NINDS and The BRAIN Initiative

Summary

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) mission is to seek fundamental knowledge about the brain and nervous system and to use that knowledge to reduce the burden of neurological disease.

NINDS supports and performs basic, translational, and clinical neuroscience research; funds and conducts research training and career development programs to increase basic, translational and clinical neuroscience expertise; and promotes the timely dissemination of scientific discoveries and their implications for neurological health to the public, health professionals, researchers, and policy-makers.

NINDS LOGO

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) mission is to seek fundamental knowledge about the brain and nervous system and to use that knowledge to reduce the burden of neurological disease.

NINDS supports and performs basic, translational, and clinical neuroscience research; funds and conducts research training and career development programs to increase basic, translational and clinical neuroscience expertise; and promotes the timely dissemination of scientific discoveries and their implications for neurological health to the public, health professionals, researchers, and policy-makers.

Upper left: When asked about the goals of her research, Bibiana Bielekova, M.D., doesn’t mince words: “We want to understand multiple sclerosis so that we can cure it.”  Upper Rigtht: A team led by Kevin Briggman is recording the activity of tens of thousands of individual neurons and preparing to create a sort of wiring diagram, a map that shows each cellular connection at the synapse. Lower right: In 2012, NIH researcher Avindra Nath traveled to Uganda to investigate a mysterious illness striking children between ages 5 and 15 in Acholi—a remote region in the north of that African nation  Lower left: In a new study, scientists at the National Institutes of Health took a molecular-level journey into microtubules, the hollow cylinders inside brain cells that act as skeletons and internal highways. They watched how a protein called tubulin acetyltransferase (TAT) labels the inside of microtubules.

Upper left: Bibiana Bielekova, M.D. “We want to understand multiple sclerosis so that we can cure it.”
Upper Rigtht: A team led by Kevin Briggman is recording the activity of tens of thousands of individual neurons and preparing to create a sort of wiring diagram, a map that shows each cellular connection at the synapse.
Lower right: In 2012, NIH researcher Avindra Nath traveled to Uganda to investigate a mysterious illness striking children.
Lower left: NINDS scientists took a molecular-level journey into microtubules and how a protein called tubulin acetyltransferase (TAT) labels the inside of microtubules.

Web Information

Website:  ninds.nih.gov
YouTube Channel:  youtube.com/user/NIHNINDS
Wikipedia Entry: wiki/National_Institute_of_Neurological_Disorders_and_Stroke
Follow NINDS

Contact Information

For health or medical questions and general information:

NIH Neurological Institute
P.O. Box 5801
Bethesda, MD 20824

Voice: (800) 352-9424 or (301) 496-5751
For access to free Telecommunications Relay Services (TRS) for people with hearing or speech impairments, dial 7-1-1 on your telephone.

For inquiries regarding NINDS Extramural Programs:

NINDS – Neuroscience Center
Division of Extramural Research
6001 Executive Boulevard Suite 3309
Bethesda, MD 20892- 9531*

*This address should not be used for Fedex, overnight, or other time-sensitive deliveries. If you are sending a Fedex or other time-sensitive delivery, please contact the recipient for a specific address. The NINDS Organizational Listing contains telephone numbers for NINDS program directors and other NINDS staff.

For researchers or laboratories at NINDS:

You can identify the laboratory or investigator’s address using the

Intramural Labs at NINDS web pag

Organization

Acting Director: Walter Koroshetz
Advisory Council
Staff Listing

Overview

From webpage

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) conducts and supports research on brain and nervous system disorders. Created by the U.S. Congress in 1950, NINDS is one of the more than two dozen research institutes and centers that comprise the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The NIH, located in Bethesda, Maryland, is an agency of the Public Health Service within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NINDS has occupied a central position in the world of neuroscience for more than 50 years.

More than 600 disorders afflict the nervous system. Common disorders such as stroke, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, and autism are well-known. Many other neurological disorders are rare-known only to the individuals and families affected, their doctors, and scientists who look to rare disorders for clues to a general understanding of the brain as well as for treatments for specific diseases. Neurological disorders strike an estimated 50 million Americans each year, exacting an incalculable personal toll and an annual economic cost of hundreds of billions of dollars in medical expenses and lost productivity.

The mission of NINDS is to seek fundamental knowledge about the brain and nervous system and to use that knowledge to reduce the burden of neurological disease. To accomplish this goal the NINDS supports and conducts basic, translational, and clinical research on the normal and diseased nervous system. The Institute also fosters the training of investigators in the basic and clinical neurosciences, and seeks better understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of neurological disorders.

Basic research pursues an understanding of the normal and abnormal structure and activities of the human nervous system. The knowledge gained from this research creates the foundation for diagnosing and treating brain disease. Some important areas of NINDS basic research include: biology of the cells of the nervous system, brain and nervous system development, genetics of the brain, cognition and behavior, neurodegeneration, brain plasticity and repair, neural signaling, learning and memory, motor control and integration, sensory function, and neural channels, synapses, and circuits. The great challenge of modern neuroscience is to translate the remarkable findings of basic science into useful therapies for those who suffer the devastating effects of neurological disorders. To facilitate this translation, NINDS supports many specific research projects and research resources that accelerate preclinical therapy development.

Clinical research applies directly to mechanisms of the diseases of the nervous system which can then be translated into disease detection, prevention, and treatment, such as studies of brain imaging techniques, trials to test new drugs, and development of novel therapies such as stem cell implants and gene transfer. Some key areas of NINDS clinical research include: neurological consequences of AIDS, Alzheimer’s disease, brain tumors, developmental disorders, epilepsy, motor neuron diseases, muscular dystrophies, multiple sclerosis, neurogenetic disorders, pain, Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, sleep disorders, spinal cord injury, stroke, and traumatic brain injury.

Most NINDS-funded research is conducted by extramural scientists in public and private institutions, such as universities, medical schools, and hospitals. NINDS intramural scientists, working in the Institute’s laboratories, branches, and clinics, also conduct research in most of the major areas of neuroscience and on many of the most important and challenging neurological disorders.

The Institute’s interests, however, are not limited to NINDS programs. The Institute collaborates with other NIH components, as well as with other federal agencies, and with voluntary, professional and commercial organizations.

NINDS also is committed to laying the foundation for neuroscience in the years ahead. To achieve this goal, the Institute funds research training and development to help build the next generation of neuroscientists. In addition, NINDS serves as a prime source of neurological information for scientists, clinicians, and the publi

Research

NINDS Research Webs

General Research Topics

Disorder Specific Topics

Disorder-related research information can also be found by visiting the NINDS Disorder A-Z Index.

Additional Resources from NINDS/NIH

NINDS Intramural Research

Phase II of the John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research Center [PNRC II] is the second part of a previously planned 600,000 gross square feet biomedical research facility located along the western campus edge of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The first part or Phase I, which represents approximately 45% of the facility, was completed in 2004 and is now fully occupied by a variety of scientists from different Institutes, working in collaboration in an array of research laboratories, animal care facilities, imaging suites, offices, and associated support facilities

Phase II of the John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research Center [PNRC II] is the second part of a previously planned 600,000 gross square feet biomedical research facility located along the western campus edge of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The first part or Phase I, which represents approximately 45% of the facility, was completed in 2004 and is now fully occupied by a variety of scientists from different Institutes, working in collaboration in an array of research laboratories, animal care facilities, imaging suites, offices, and associated support facilities

 

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