About the Open Network

The Open Network (ON) is an open access, crowdsourced, and curated network of public Knowledge Hubs... that aggregate and promote the best knowledge about a topic and its related news, events, resources, people, and organizations.

About this BRAIN Initiative Hub

The BRAIN Initiative Hub's mission is to complement existing BRAIN related websites such as the NIH website and braininitiative.org.

One goal of this Hub is to provide researchers, educators, and the public in the US and around the world an opportunity to learn more about the objectives, methods, progress, and potential benefits of Initiative related research and the PIs, labs, and universities behind the research. Another goal is to facilitate and catalyze researcher interaction, collaboration, and innovation.

This Hub is part of the Neuroscience Knowledge Network of Hubs. The Neuroscience Knowledge Network (NKN) is managed by Open Networks, a non-profit social enterprise chartered in PA as the Association for Neuroscience Communications. To learn more about NKN and Open Networks, view the homepage post at neuroscience.onair.cc

BRAIN Initiative Overview

The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative is aimed at revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain.

Kavli and The BRAIN Initiative

The Kavli Foundation is continuing its support for the goals of the BRAIN Initiative and for innovative brain research. Consistent with its commitment in 2013, Kavli and its University Partners have commited $100 Million to brain research by forming three new Kavli Institutes in addition to supporting its existing four institutes.

The Kavli Foundation, based in Oxnard, California, is dedicated to the goals of advancing science for the benefit of humanity and promoting increased public understanding and support for scientists and their work.

Bioethics Commission Reports

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues 2013 has published two reports.

In Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society, the Bioethics Commission analyzed why and how to achieve ethics integration early and explicitly throughout neuroscience research.

In Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society, the Bioethics Commission broadly considered the ethical and societal implications of neuroscience research and its applications.

DARPA and the BRAIN Initiative

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) mission is to create breakthrough technologies for US national security and to protect the health of U.S. service members and veterans.

To better address the health needs of service members and veterans, DARPA has launched four programs that support the goals of the BRAIN Initiative: RAM (Restoring Active Memory), RAM Replay, HAPTIX (Hand Proprioception and Touch Interfaces), and SUBNETS (Systems-Based Neurotechnology for Emerging Therapies).

IARPA & the BRAIN Initiative

The acronyms for the four BRAIN Initiative related IARPA programs are ICArUS. MICrONS, KRNS, and SHARP.

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) invests in high-risk, high-payoff research programs to tackle some of the most difficult challenges of the agencies and disciplines in the Intelligence Community (IC). IARPA does not have an operational mission and does not deploy technologies directly to the field. Instead, IARPA facilitates the transition of research results to our IC customers for operational application.

  • Imaging in vivo neurotransmitter modulation

    Principal Investigator: Dean Foster Wong
    Johns Hopkins University
    Title: Imaging in vivo neurotransmitter modulation of brain network activity in realtime
    BRAIN Category: Next Generation Human Imaging (RFA MH-14-217)

    Dr. Wong and colleagues will explore the possibility that newly developed infrared chemical tags may be used for minimally invasive imaging of rapidly changing human brain chemical messenger activity – with greater time resolution.

    NIH Webpages

  • Researching human spatial recognition

    NSF Science Nation Video – April 2, 2014

    With funding from the National Science Foundation, Amy Shelton is testing human spatial recognition. Study subjects learn and recall their way around a virtual maze while an MRI scans their brains. By analyzing MRI images of blood flow in the human Shelton can get a picture of how the brain learns and recalls the spatial world outside the body.

  • NIH Neuroscience Seminar- April 13, 2015

    TITLE: Mechanisms of ubiquitin signaling in gene regulation and chromatin dynamics

    AUTHOR: Cynthia Wolberger, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University

    TIME: 12:00:00 PM  DATE: Monday, April 13, 2015

    PLACE: Porter Neuroscience Research Center

    Live NIH Videocast (archived after seminar)

  • Dean Foster Wong

    Professor, Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Radiology and Radiological Science
    Radiology Vice Chair, Research Administration and Training
    Director, Section of High Resolution Brain PET Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine

    Dr. Wong has used PET scanning to uncover key insights into brain chemistry and to identify receptors for the major neurotransmitters. He oversaw the first dopamine PET receptor imaging in human beings; led the first study suggesting D2 dopamine receptors in schizophrenia, and how dopamine is transported in and out of cells.

  • Neuroscience Discovery Institute @JHU

    The mission of the new Kavli Neuroscience Discovery Institute (Kavli NDI) at JHU is to bring together neuroscientists, engineers and data scientists to investigate neural development, neuronal plasticity, perception and cognition.

    “The challenges of tomorrow will not be confined to distinct disciplines, and neither will be the solutions we create,” said Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels. “The Kavli Foundation award is a tremendous honor, because it allows Johns Hopkins to build on our history of pioneering neuroscience and catalyze new partnerships with engineers and data scienctists that will be essential to building a unified understanding of brain function.”

  • Richard Huganir

    Professor and Director, Department of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University
    Co-Director, Brain Science Institute; and HHMI investigator
    President, Society for Neuroscience (2017-2018)
    Member, Multi-Council Working Group (NIMH council)

    Huganir’s lab is credited for examining the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of neurotransmitter receptor function with a focus on glutamate receptors.Their studies have suggested that regulation of receptor function may be a major mechanism for the regulation of synaptic plasticity in the nervous system in health and disease.

  • John Hopkins Neuroscience

    John Hopkins has two primary centers for neuroscience research:

    The Solomon Snyder Department of Neuroscience in the School of Medicine and the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences in the School of Arts & Sciences.

    Current research ranges from investigating the development of the nervous system, synaptic plasticity and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of learning and memory to the neural basis of higher brain function such as perception and decision-making.

  • Kavli Foundation

    The Kavli Foundation is continuing its support for the goals of the BRAIN Initiative and for innovative brain research.

    Consistent with its commitment in 2013, Kavli and its University Partners have commited $100 Million to brain research by forming three new Kavli Institutes in addition to supporting its existing four institutes.

    The Kavli Foundation, based in Oxnard, California, is dedicated to the goals of advancing science for the benefit of humanity and promoting increased public understanding and support for scientists and their work.

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